4Hoteliers
SEARCH
SHARE THIS PAGE
NEWSLETTERS
CONTACT US
SUBMIT CONTENT
ADVERTISING
Young Chinese citizens say goodbye to group tours.
Tuesday, 17th January 2012
Source : ITB World Travel Trends Report
In the near future, the sight of groups of Chinese tourists following their tour guides around to the most beautiful tourist attractions could well become a thing of the past.

Young and wealthy Chinese citizens fascinated by technology and with a desire to experience individual forms of travel are no longer taking the kind of trips once popular with many Chinese people.

According to the latest ITB World Travel Trends Report, Chinese citizens' travel habits are undergoing huge change. In order to keep up with the ever-increasing number of Chinese tourists the international travel industry must tailor its services to meet the demands of China's new generation of tourists. Chinese speaking staff, typical Chinese dishes, and communicating via China's popular social media channels could well be the recipes for success.

The economic boom is the driving force behind Chinese citizens' desire to travel. Well-educated young professionals in particular are benefiting from the economic boom and can afford to take international trips which focus on experiencing something new.

The demand is for high-quality service rather than low-cost group tours. China's tourists want to experience individual travel. While visiting as many attractions as possible remains an important part of a tour, factors such as relaxation and entertainment have now moved further up the wish list. For many Chinese people shopping is still one of their favourite activities when travelling abroad. One indicator of this is the average amount of money they spend per visit, which has now reached double-digit figures.

In order for the travel industry to be acknowledged by Chinese tourists it must meet their specific requests and demands and respect their local culture and customs. Chinese speaking staff and audio guides in museums ensure that tourists feel welcome. For many travellers, additional comforts such as a kettle in one's room for preparing snacks in between meals or Chinese dishes on the hotel restaurant menu are seen as respecting their culture.

Baidu instead of Facebook

Tour operators should also take the needs and habits of Chinese people into account on their websites. Individual information pertaining to the market as well as links to Chinese search engines such as Baidu are what is required, instead of simply translating one's own content.

Websites should be hosted in China to enable a quick response to any censorship activities. Furthermore, they should not contain any links to websites which are banned in China, such as Facebook or YouTube. Chinese citizens go on different social networking sites, and this must be taken into account.

For Chinese people, taking their specific cultural aspects into account is equivalent to affording someone respect, whereas for many Chinese tourists a website that ignores their needs is tantamount to a bad travel experience.

Dr. Martin Buck, the director of the Competence Center Travel and Logistics at Messe Berlin: "In China, social networking takes place through channels different to those in the West. Tourism managers need to be aware of typical national aspects, including in the digital sphere, in order to achieve success on the market."

Digital natives – including with travel planning

For China's young generation of digital natives especially, social media, online bookings and mobile technologies are indispensable tools for planning and booking trips. In particular those who wish to travel abroad make use of online media to prepare in detail and to obtain information on their travel destination, and after a trip they share their experiences with other community members on the web.

92 per cent of China's internet users go on social networking sites, around twice as many as in Europe or the US. However, according to the ITB World Travel Trends Report, despite the rapid rise of online bookings for flights, tours and accommodation, they have not yet left conventional travel agencies behind.

Chinese tourists remain eager to travel, and Chinese citizens are well on the way to soon becoming one of the world's main source markets for tourism. According to estimates by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), 66 million Chinese citizens travelled abroad this year, 15 per cent more than in 2010.

Even if the majority of these day trips and those including overnight stays are to former colonies, i.e. Hong Kong and Macau, the number of trips taken by Chinese citizens to other countries in Asia and beyond is increasing rapidly. I

PK's Asian Travel Monitor expects that by the end of the year Chinese citizens will have undertaken around 18 million trips with overnight stays to destinations abroad. The most popular countries in Europe for Chinese holidaymakers are Germany and France.

About ITB Berlin and the ITB Berlin Convention

ITB Berlin 2012 will be taking place from Wednesday, 7 to Sunday, 11 March, and from Wednesday to Friday will be open to trade visitors only. Parallel with the trade show, the ITB Berlin Convention, the largest travel industry event of its kind in the world, will be held from Wednesday, 7 to Friday, 9 March 2012. Additional information is available at www.itb-convention.com. ITB Berlin is the global travel industry's leading trade show. In 2011 a total of 11,163 companies from 188 countries displayed their products and services to 170,000 visitors, who included 110,791 trade visitors.
 Latest News  (Click title to read article)




 Latest Articles  (Click title to read)




 Most Read Articles  (Click title to read)




~ Important Notice ~
Articles appearing on 4Hoteliers contain copyright material. They are meant for your personal use and may not be reproduced or redistributed. While 4Hoteliers makes every effort to ensure accuracy, we can not be held responsible for the content nor the views expressed, which may not necessarily be those of either the original author or 4Hoteliers or its agents.
© Copyright 4Hoteliers 2001-2022 ~ unless stated otherwise, all rights reserved.
You can read more about 4Hoteliers and our company here
Use of this web site is subject to our
terms & conditions of service and privacy policy