4Hoteliers
SEARCH
SHARE THIS PAGE
NEWSLETTERS
CONTACT US
SUBMIT CONTENT
ADVERTISING
The Critical Connection Between Resilient Workplaces And Diversity.
By Eileen McDargh
Friday, 18th April 2014
 
The standard concept of sustainability is the capacity of biological systems to remain diverse and productive over time - like healthy wetlands and old growth forests.

In the workplace, sustainability is equally important in considering the two-legged biological 'systems' that sit in cubicles, drive to sales calls, conduct virtual meetings, perform surgery, write manuals, handle customers, and a host of other activities.

For an organization to survive and thrive in this competitive, 24/7 world, resiliency translates into staying power - staying power that keeps great employees and clients; staying power that offers up innovation and collaboration; staying power that fosters smart productivity without exhausting the people who perform.† Without that staying power, there is NO sustainability. And there can be no staying power without diversity.

Imagine an ocean heavily weighted with sharks. In time, food would be depleted and the sharks would turn on each other (this might sound like some companies you know).† If everyone in an organization looked alike, spoke alike, and thought alike - in time the organization would shrivel and disappear because the world and a customer base no longer resemble a singular entity.

From my vantage point as both a teacher and student of resiliency, I believe that resiliency of thought is the next horizon for Diversity and Inclusion programs.

This article is designed to add another dimension: do we both seek and listen to others whose THOUGHTS are different from ours? The LA TIMES reported that "months before California's new disability claims system debuted, a whistle-blower told his superiors it contained errors that could mar a successful launch. His predictions proved accurate."† However, diversity of thought was NOT acceptable and, for EDD employee Michael O'Brien, reassignment was in order.

From my work within a variety of organizations, failure to listen to others who offer a contrary viewpoint can hamper progress, profitability, and performance.

Here are two recommendations to encourage the fostering and acceptance of diverse thought:

1.† Ask for input from the youngest or newest employees.

Here's why. They come with fresh eyes, un-jaded by politics or personalities. Do something with the input and let them know what you did. Thank them for their input. Use what you can and let them know what pieces you cannot put into action and why.† Do this on a regular basis and I guarantee you will create a wellspring of enthusiasm and commitment.

2.† Seek input from those "closest" to the action.

Soldiers on a battlefield have a far different view of the terrain and the enemy than generals sitting in a war room. The truck driver who makes long-distance hauls knows more about what is needed in a dependable 18-wheeler than someone sitting in purchasing.
†††
Be sure to recognize all those to seek and report out what they learned from others. Create a "what did I learn today" tweet post that reflects† a new way of looking at something.† The more you encourage diversity of thought, the more resilient and sustainable your organization becomes.

Eileen McDargh is a Hall of Fame motivational speaker, management consultant, resiliency expert and top thought-leader in leadership.† Visit The Resiliency Group website† to get her free quarterly e-zine, read her blog and articles.† Discover why hundreds of satisfied clients from all over the globe hire Eileen to keynote at their meetings and facilitate their retreats. © 2014, The Resiliency Group. Reprinted with permission.
Global Brand Awareness & Marketing Tools at 4Hoteliers.com ...[Click for More]
 Latest News  (Click title to read article)




 Latest Articles  (Click title to read)




 Most Read Articles  (Click title to read)




~ Important Notice ~
Articles appearing on 4Hoteliers contain copyright material. They are meant for your personal use and may not be reproduced or redistributed. While 4Hoteliers makes every effort to ensure accuracy, we can not be held responsible for the content nor the views expressed, which may not necessarily be those of either the original author or 4Hoteliers or its agents.
© Copyright 4Hoteliers 2001-2023 ~ unless stated otherwise, all rights reserved.
You can read more about 4Hoteliers and our company here
Use of this web site is subject to our
terms & conditions of service and privacy policy